South Sudan


In December 2014, fighting in South Sudan escalated due to a political crisis.  Within a few months, more than 1.5 million people were displaced inside the country and into neighbouring countries.

South Sudan
Leadership

The conflict was marked by widespread sexual and gender-based violence, mass killings, ethnic targeting, torture, and the use of child soldiers.
 

In February 2014, a system-wide Level 3 (L3) response was activated. The Operational Peer Review (OPR) took place in June 2015 and focused on:

The OPR team included representatives from the STAIT, Concern International, OCHA, Norwegian Refugee Council, WFP, and WHO. They conducted meetings, workshops, and interviews with over 300 people from the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT), clusters/sectors, humanitarian actors, donors, national counter-parts, and senior representatives from the peacekeeping mission.
 

Field missions were undertaken in Akobo, Bor, and Migkaman, where the team met with front-line humanitarian practitioners, local authorities, and people affected by the crisis.

"The OPR team included representatives from the STAIT, Concern International, OCHA, Norwegian Refugee Council, WFP, and WHO."

There were insufficient logistics capacity to cover South Sudan’s difficult terrain, as well as important security and political constraints that were impeding operations. The OPR recognised that the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) and HCT had agreed to formulate a clear vision for prioritising activities given the substantial funding, human resources, and access constraints.

The OPR team worked with the HCT to develop an action plan that set out required actions to strengthen the response, including:

"There were important security and political constraints that were impeding operations."

Follow up:
UNHCR conducted a mission to support the national protection cluster. The HCT developed a Centrality of Protection Strategy. 
 

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